The Cape Cod seaside

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New England has gorgeous beaches, with long stretches of white sand, as here on Cape Cod and elsewhere, and also intricate, rocky coastlines, which are found mostly in Maine, whose 3,478 miles of coastline is longer than California’s.

New England beaches aren’t known for their gorgeously varied, multi-colored shells in the way the Florida and Gulf Coast beaches are, but if you look closely, you can come to appreciate the mussel, clam, oyster, whelk, scallop, slipper, quahog, and jingle shells that predominate here on the upper East Coast of the U.S.

Yesterday, on a beach at the tip of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, I noticed how subtly beautiful the shells, rocks, and seaweed were as they rode together on the waves of high tide.

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Almost reminiscent of a Tree of Life.

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Seaweed at sunset.

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Multi-colored seaweed clutching to a stone.

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Slipper shells piled on top of other slipper shells in a Yertle-the-Turtle pile.

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A jumble of colors.

 

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See how the seaweed attaches itself to the rock and the shells.

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A gorgeous slipper shell, green, white, and red.

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Just one strand is enough to keep the seaweed hanging on.

A shell serving as an incubator for tiny shells.

A shell serving as an incubator for tiny shells.

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Attached stone, shells, and seaweed in the surf.

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The rocks can also be gorgeous, especially if contrasting seaweed is attached!

The slipper shells have almost swallowed up this stone.

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A riot of colors.

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A slipper shell sandwich.

Night comes to the beaches of Cape Cod.

Night comes to the beaches of Cape Cod.